Can A Female Cannabis Plant Produce Seeds Without Being Pollinated

In this guide, we’ll review the basics of small-scale cannabis breeding and illustrate the benefits these techniques provide to those who want to create their own cannabis seeds and strains. Hello, I have 3 plants on week 6 of flower under a 400w HPS they are all female and I had one male I removed at week 1 of flower. Here is my issue. Besides using tap water and having to adjust for that issue. 2 of the 3 plants are producing a couple seeds ( say 4-5 seeds per plant scattered on diff. buds.) There is no way I figure that they could have been pollinated and the seeds came from bagseed of an outdoor skunk crop.(2-3 seasons old) poss. sweet skunk ( looks identical). There is a I was wondering if there are no males on the grow site will the unpollenated buds contain seeds? and if yes, how many seeds can an unpollinated bud have if…

The Home Grower’s Guide to Simple Cannabis Breeding

Cannabis propagation is a lengthy and complicated process that can take years to understand and decades to master. However, it doesn’t have to be, at least not for the home grower looking to get into breeding on a small scale. For some, breeding can be as simple as fortifying a small seed stock for next year’s crop, or even taking your favorite strain and keeping its pollen to cross with other desirable female genotypes or phenotypes in the future.

In this guide, we’ll review the basics of small-scale cannabis breeding techniques and illustrate the benefits these techniques may provide to those who want to create their very own unique cannabis seeds and strains.

Why Breed Cannabis at Home?

What’s the big deal about breeding cannabis at home, anyway? For starters, breeding cannabis affords a home grower access to new hybrid genetics while also acting as a conservation mechanism to preserve (and even strengthen) desired genetics for future use. If you have distinct strains and want to create hybrids, breeding on this scale is both easy and effective.

On the other hand, those who wish to carry seed stock through to the next season will find breeding to be a sustainable alternative to keep those genetics around. Not every grower can afford to go back to the nursery or seed company and purchase new genetics between every season. After all, in most states the cost of a single clone can exceed $20, while a dozen cannabis seeds could easily cost $100 or more. For many micro-budget home growers, breeding is the only way to keep genetics around.

What Are the Limitations of Breeding for Home Growers?

Breeding cannabis at home does not come without its own setbacks and limitations. Medical and recreational growers in legal states must first comply with all their local ordinances pertaining to home cultivation. These include everything from plant counts to canopy limits and more. Breeding on this scale becomes a matter of adapting to these spatial and quantifiable limitations.

For instance, a popular breeding practice involves propagating genotypes in large batches (sometimes hundreds of plants in number) to see the widest margin of genetic variation possible. This allows growers to select only the most desirable phenotypes to cultivate further. However, when you have a maximum household plant count of 12, this isn’t possible. Home breeders must work around these issues if they wish to both breed and propagate sinsemilla cannabis (without seed) as well.

A Simple Propagation Technique for Small-Batch Breeding

If, despite the potential roadblocks, you’re looking to tackle some small-batch breeding at home, here’s a simple propagation technique you can follow.

See also  Mephisto Cannabis Seeds

What You’ll Need:

  • One mature male cannabis plant, between 2-3 weeks into bloom phase (or collected male pollen)
  • One mature female cannabis plant, between 2-3 weeks into bloom phase
  • Isolated propagation chamber (e.g. a sealed grow tent or equivalent)
  • Gloves
  • Small paint brush
  • Plastic baggies and ties

Procedure:

1. Sanitize

First, you must work within a clean and sanitized environment. Begin by cleaning your isolation chamber in preparation of receiving the female plant. A clean space will both help to prevent cross-contamination and provide a safe and sanitary place for the plant to fully mature. Diluting a small concentration of bleach or isopropyl alcohol with water should do the trick. Don’t forget to sanitize any pollination tools, like your paint brush, as well.

Make sure that your isolation chamber does not contain any female plants that you do not wish to breed with. This will ensure the prevention of unwanted cross-pollination. However, if more than one female cannabis plant must mature within the same space, implementing the following selective pollination technique (which involves using plastic baggies and some ties to protect the pollinated colas) should still adequately protect your room.

2. Collect Pollen

Male cannabis plants will begin to show their pollen sacs within the first week or two into their bloom phase. Shortly after, these sacs will open and pollen will become abundantly available. Once a desirable male plant has been identified, remove it from any female plants and isolate it immediately. The goal is to collect the staminate pollen without accidentally open-pollinating any other female plant.

Keep the desired male plant in isolation throughout the pollen collection process, then terminate the male to be safe. By using a small paintbrush, you can carefully collect pollen into a plastic bag or glass jar.

Keep in mind that pollen is “alive” and that humidity can dramatically affect the viability of the pollen. For storage, keep male pollen sealed in an airtight container and store in a cold, dark space such as a freezer for long-term holding. If you plan to access your pollen more than a few times per year, it’s generally better to keep it in a refrigerator because the temperature swing from storage to room temperature is much lower. Properly stored pollen may last for over a year under ideal conditions.

3. Selectively Propagate

A female cannabis plant in bloom is mature enough to receive pollen once flowers begin to form hair-like stigma. Without complicating this process too much, the object of selective pollination is to place male pollen onto specific branches or colas from which the breeder wishes to produce seeds. Each cola can produce hundreds of seeds if pollinated properly.

Choosing which/how many branches to pollinate will come down to grower/breeder preference. A single cannabis bud that has been pollinated can easily yield 20-30 mature seeds.

To complete this process:

  1. Make sure there is negative pressure in the isolation chamber before continuing.
  2. Prepare by collecting the baggie containing your male pollen, a paintbrush, and gloves.
  3. Gently collect a small amount of pollen from the collection baggie with your brush (a little goes a very, very long way).
  4. Run the brush gently across desired female flowers, making sure to only run the bristles across the tops of each stigma.
  5. Once a cola has been pollinated, you may seal the cola by covering it with a clean plastic baggie and tying it off to form an airtight seal (this will prevent cross-contamination). Note: this step is not necessary if (a) you intend to pollinate the entire plant in isolation, or (b) you do not have any issues with potentially finding a few seeds throughout the rest of your pollinated plant. (Pollen spreads easily, making this is a possibility.)
  6. To prevent any further contamination, keep your isolation chamber sealed throughout the maturation process.
See also  Seed Cannabis Boston

This application process should repeat 1-3 times over the course of a week or two. After the fourth week of bloom, you may suspend your process. Should you need to reintroduce your pollenated female back into a room with other maturing female plants, you can rinse the plant down with clean water immediately following pollination to remove any excess pollen. This isn’t one hundred percent fail-proof, but when done carefully and correctly it can encourage the plant to breathe a little better.

4. Harvest and Collect Seeds

Your seeds should be fully mature once the plant has completed senescence. For ripe plants containing seed stock, it’s best to let the life cycle exacerbate fully before harvesting to give seeds their maximum time to mature.

After you harvest and dry your plants, it’s then time to collect seeds. Fully mature seeds are darker and often contain striped patterns covering their encasing. If executed correctly, you should yield a healthy quantity of seeds no matter how may colas you choose to pollinate. Congratulations, you’re now a certified home breeder!

Thread: Female plant producing seed without male

Hello, I have 3 plants on week 6 of flower under a 400w HPS they are all female and I had one male I removed at week 1 of flower. Here is my issue. Besides using tap water and having to adjust for that issue. 2 of the 3 plants are producing a couple seeds ( say 4-5 seeds per plant scattered on diff. buds.) There is no way I figure that they could have been pollinated and the seeds came from bagseed of an outdoor skunk crop.(2-3 seasons old) poss. sweet skunk ( looks identical). There is a diff. in the thickness of buds on these 2 plants either they are not packing on as much weight although I still have about 4 weeks left. Veg time was 6-7 weeks and they are about 4 feet high now and they were pinched and bent at 12 inches. I am growing organically with bio bizz line of nutes ( grow, bloom, top maxx). I think it may be due to the seed genetics/ how they were produce outside just random pollination. It’s my first grow so I didn’t want to buy seeds since I had a random 60 sitting around. I had major germination problems and the seeds that did germinate like half of the seeds popped but wouldnt emerge through the soil. Any one have any ideas?

Bagseed plants are notorious for self-pollinating (hermiphrodite) late in flowering. Generally, the outdoor commercial weed isn’t pollinated with males (which are culled), but by hermi-females that are harder to see. This results in hermi-seeds. It’s very hard to find a reliable female from bagseed.

Your germination problems are also due to the fact that they were bagseed. It’s usually compressed and stored in a way that kills the seed. Seeds need to be stored in a cool, dry place to stay viable.

There’s nothing wrong with growing some bagseed. Hopefully you got some decent smoke and learned a lot. In the future, any seeds you buy from a breeder are going to seem like a breeze!

See also  Cannabis Time Lapse Seed To Harvest

CAN FEMALE PLANTS PRODUCE SEEDS WITHOUT POLLENATiON?

What to do if your female plant starts to produce seeds late in flowering?

Blacktophat
Well-Known Member

it is totally possible for unpollinated buds to produce seeds. certain genetics do that as a last hope to reproduce. ive read/seen it in tons of grow videos and books. cant recall them of course. i will if i think of it.

er0senin
Well-Known Member

it is totally possible for unpollinated buds to produce seeds. certain genetics do that as a last hope to reproduce. ive read/seen it in tons of grow videos and books. cant recall them of course. i will if i think of it.

Yes this is when female plants spits out ballsacks to make sure its survival after overflowering stress or ph issues. there is no such thing as seeds without pollen. even hermie seeds have 2x kromosomes, its impossible without the right amount of kromosomes.

Geronimo420
Well-Known Member

you can’t get seeds without pollen. A real female with no hermie sign can still be force to make some pollen if sprayed with silver thiosulfate or colloidal sylver it’s how they make all-females seeds

Cloudz2600
Well-Known Member

you can’t get seeds without pollen. A real female with no hermie sign can still be force to make some pollen if sprayed with silver thiosulfate or colloidal sylver it’s how they make all-females seeds

I thought colloidal silver caused herms. Barring some miracle of immaculate conception I don’t see how it would be possible.

growone
Well-Known Member

as bizarre as it sounds, there may be some mechanism for this to occur, seeds without hermie blooms
not saying it has happened in cannabis, some variation on parthenogenesis

Wetdog
Well-Known Member

No. It would be like a virgin birth, if that even happened.

growone
Well-Known Member

in plants, it’s called Apomixis, and it is virgin birth, so strange
you’ll get an identical genetic twin to the parent, some plants do this, not sure about MJ

billybob420
Well-Known Member

No pollen no seeds. Pollen can come from the female though.

vendetta23
Member

so not to sound way out there or anything but jorge cerventas has discussed the fact that streamlines(winds on a global scale) carry 200,000+ ppm of cannabis pollen all over the world. Now having said that, just because there are no males around doesn’t mean you plant didn’t get pollinated.

vendetta23
Member

so not to sound way out there or anything but jorge cerventas has discussed the fact that streamlines(winds on a global scale) carry 200,000+ ppm of cannabis pollen all over the world. Now having said that, just because there are no males around doesn’t mean you plant didn’t get pollinated.

dank smoker420
Well-Known Member
HapaHaole
Well-Known Member

ah ha ha LUV IT!

Jesus Weed!

I have read it every where (because I have been searching for answers), all over the internet, Ed’s book, here at RIP re: Females that throw a few seeds at the end of their life cycle.

One thing NO ONE says is, “what to do about it”.

Take ’em early to preserve what potency is there before they put more energy in to seeding? (if that even matters at this stage)
or.
Leave ’em alone to finish (mine has about 6-13 days left)?
or.
anyway, I can’t find that part. Glad you guys posted here tho so TY!