Best Soil For Cannabis Seeds

The best soil for cannabis plants depends on a variety of factors. Learn how to find or make the best soil for growing marijuana! Soil is the medium of choice for most cannabis cultivators. Here is what you need to know to get the most out of your soil grow! Been trying to figure out what is the best soil for cannabis? Not sure where to start? Read on to learn more about different soils and what's right for you.

What is the best soil for cannabis growing?

If you’ve thought about growing, you’ve probably already thought about the best soil for cannabis.

You likely didn’t give it that much thought, though, because who takes time to think about soil?

Well, the soil that you grow your marijuana in is very important, so if you want to grow the best weed possible, you should pay some attention to it.

This guide will cover everything you need to know about the common growing medium.

How to choose the best soil for marijuana plants:

The basics of using soil for marijuana grows

Plants typically need three things to survive: water, light, and soil.

Soil may seem obvious, but nowadays, with soil alternatives and hydroponic growing, even that is optional.

However, for most growers, especially those who are new to growing marijuana, growing in soil is the best option.

Soil growing (instead of growing in nutrient-infused water) is one of the easiest and most familiar methods of growing.

Plus, attempting to grow hydroponically the first time you are growing marijuana is almost guaranteed to be a recipe for disaster.

Soil is simply the natural way to grow, but it is still important to start with a good quality soil.

After all, it provides the plant’s nutrients and helps the plant form stable roots.

High-quality soil is especially important for outdoor plants who could face potentially harsh winds and other environmental conditions.

Why grow marijuana in soil?

Great soil can help your plants thrive, so it is essential to first understand what soil is.

It is definitely more than dirt.

Advantages of using soil

The soil is the most natural medium for growing almost all kinds of plants. It means that most people already are familiar with or have experience in doing it.

In effect, it is easier and less stressful to use than other modes of planting, which requires a learning curve.

Another advantage is its simplicity in making it work. Just watering the soil is enough for most plants to grow.

Also, the supplies needed are few compared to using other costlier mediums.

Natural soils are made up of mineral particles, air, organic matter, water and biological organisms.

Disadvantages of Using Soil

Since soil is an organic material, it is natural for bugs to live in it.

Therefore, the plants are more prone to suffer from pest infestations.

There is also the issue of slower growth.

In contrast, marijuana grown using hydroponics enjoys explosive growth due to faster and more efficient nutrient absorption.

Nearly 25% of soil is air that exists in a gaseous phase –not quite liquid or solid.

Water

Water is known as soil solution, a liquid made of water, and ions from dissolved salts, and chemicals.

These ions are unable to attach to minerals in the soil.

Water also makes up nearly 25% of soil. The mineral particles in soil consist of sand, clay, and silt.

These inorganic particles can significantly impact a soil’s quality.

These tiny fragments of rocks and hard minerals (such as quartz) do not carry any nutrients, meaning large amounts of it in your soil is a bad thing.

Soil with lots of sand is arid;

however, small to moderate amounts can improve drainage and aeration as well as increase tilling quality.

This mixture of sand and minerals has some nutrients, but not many.

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It is is beneficial for soil, as it can include the important nutrients of K, Ca, Mg and Fe- making soil fertile.

Clay is aluminum-silicate and has negatively charged ions that attract these nutrients to it.

However, if there is too much clay, it will be hard to till the soil, and there will also be poor drainage.

Soil also includes a variety of organic matter and substances such as:

  • Decomposing plant and animal particles
  • Organisms and microorganisms living in the soil
  • Substances produced by roots and microorganisms

These exist in smaller amounts, typically around 5%. Although there isn’t much organic matter in soil, its presence highly influences its quality and the eventual yield of your plants.

The particles and substances are also known as humus, whereas organisms may include earthworms and other beneficial creatures.

How to recognize the best soil for cannabis

Now that you understand what soil is, it is much easier to recognize good soil when you see it.

Marijuana soil has some specific requirements, so unless you are buying soil that is specifically designed for cannabis, you’ll want to learn to pay attention to certain things.

Good soil will have the correct texture, drainage ability and water retention for marijuana. It will look dark and rich, with a loose texture that isn’t muddy.

Good marijuana soil also drains well – you should be able to pour water on it and have it drain out within a few seconds.

The soil should retain enough water for the plant to thrive, as the roots need that water, but it shouldn’t be so much that the roots cannot get enough oxygen either.

This is why both proper drainage and water retention are essential aspects of good soil.

Good soil also has good ingredients. Of course, soils that include some form of organic matter (humus) are great for marijuana because they provide plenty of nutrients.

Some examples of organic matter to look for in a good cannabis soil include:

  • Earthworm castings
  • Bat Guano
  • Blood, fish, or bone meal
  • Kelp
  • Mycorrhizae
  • Perlite
  • Pumice
  • Sandy Loam
  • Dolomite lime

If you purchase soil that has any of these ingredients in it, there’s a good chance it might provide great nutrition for your plants.

You’ll still want to make sure that it has the right nutrients for your plant’s particular stage in its life cycle though.

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Choosing soil for your marijuana plants

With an understanding of what you are looking for, you can now start to select the right soil for your plants.

The first thing to remember is that soil is highly dependent on the stage of life that your plant is in.

While it is still sprouting, it is best to use peat plugs or something similar to that.

These ready-made blocks of soil provide everything that a budding seed needs to make its way into the world.

If you can’t find, (or don’t want to use) peat plugs, an organic potting soil will also work.

Organic soils will not have any added ‘slow-release’ chemicals, something you’ll want to avoid when growing marijuana.

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While potting soils do not have the right type of nutrients to support a growing marijuana plant, they will have enough to support a seedling for its first couple of weeks.

After that point, you’ll want to supplement with nutrients that are specifically designed for marijuana plants – especially once you reach the flowering stage.

Another reason why it is okay to use potting soil (at least at first) is because you’re likely going to end up moving your plants after they are about a month old anyway.

The roots will be too big for their first home, and you should place them in a bigger container or move them outdoors.

That is the perfect time to switch out your soil for something more suitable.

If you used peat plugs, you can simply add the plugs to local dirt or grass mulch to make a suitable soil outdoors.

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Not only does this provide a better texture over the natural earth, but it also offers ample room for young roots to move around and increases the nutrient value in the soil.

You can also move your seedlings into either sterilized potting compost or a “living soil.”

If you opt for sterilized soil, it should include some form of amendment (such as perlite), that makes up at least 20% of the soil.

This additive will help increase the amount of air present in the soil, which helps marijuana plants grow faster.

Living soils, on the other hand, are composted soils.

They are useful because they include microorganisms that create an ecosystem similar to the best natural scenario.

The roots directly absorb the nutrients produced from these organisms, and the results are often noticeable in the flavor and scent of the harvest.

Choosing The Best Soil For Cannabis: A Home Grower’s Guide

Growing cannabis in soil is a great way to crop fat, flavoursome buds. Moreover, soil is one of the most forgiving substrates. What are the best soils for growing cannabis? What do you need to know if you want to make your own soil? Our guide answers these questions and more!

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Home grower’s guide to the best soil for cannabis.

Contents:

  1. What’s the best soil for growing weed?
  2. Traits of quality cannabis soil
  3. Amendments to improve soil quality
  4. Photoperiod vs autoflowering
  5. Store-bought vs homemade
  6. No-till cultivation
  7. Amendments for arid/drought conditions

When growing cannabis, using the right soil is crucial. Unfortunately, sourcing the best soil isn’t always straightforward. From cannabis-specific soils to bargain universal substrates and pre-fertilised types, the sheer amount of options can be overwhelming to novices. And what if you want to make your own soil from scratch?

Let’s talk about the best soil for growing cannabis.

WHAT’S THE BEST SOIL FOR GROWING WEED?

Not every soil is suitable for growing cannabis, and not all cannabis requires the same type of soil. Picking the optimal soil depends on the type of cannabis you’re growing, your climate, whether you’re growing at home or in the wild, etc.

Aside from these factors, there are some common traits among all cannabis soils. Let’s take a look at them:

Texture

Cannabis prefers a light and loose soil texture. A light texture promotes root development, and it ensures more oxygen reaches the roots for optimal growth and health.

Drainage ability

Cannabis soil needs to have excellent drainage. When you water your plants, it shouldn’t pool on top of the soil. If the soil has poor drainage, your plants will get sick and turn out subpar yields, or die.

Water retention

Just as important as good drainage is water retention, which is the soil’s ability to hold water. Good cannabis soil has an optimal balance of water retention and drainage.

pH value

pH is a chemical scale that indicates how acidic or alkaline something is. This is important, as cannabis only does well within a small pH range. A good soil for weed has a pH of about 6.0. A pH of 5.8–6.3 will be fine, but if it fluctuates too far outside of this range, you will get diminished yields. If the pH is seriously off, your plants will die.

Nutrients

Cannabis soil needs to contain nutrients so your plants can grow. Fortunately, almost all soils you can buy already feature them. Know, however, that these nutrients will often last only 3–4 weeks. Around the time your plants start to flower, the nutrients in commercial soils will likely be depleted. This is when you should begin to add nutrients.

If you’re growing without additional nutrients, your soil needs to contain organic substances such as humus, compost, worm castings, guano, etc. Microorganisms in the soil will turn these substances into nutrients for your plants to access on demand.

TRAITS OF QUALITY CANNABIS SOIL

If you’re using store-bought potting mixes, these are already optimally “tuned” for growing. Different story if you’re growing organically, though. Natural soil comes in four varieties: sandy, silty, loamy, and clay. But know that most soils consist of varying ratios of these soil types.

For example, a soil may be clay and loamy, or sandy and silty.

SANDY

Sandy soil is coarse with good drainage, but has poor water retention. When watered, nutrients such as nitrogen will also quickly get washed away. Sandy soil is easy to work with and is a viable choice for cannabis growers.

  • Coarse structure
  • Low pH
  • Pros: Good drainage, keeps soil airy, high oxygen levels, easy to work with
  • Cons: Poor water retention, needs frequent watering

SILTY

Silty soil is a medium-coarse soil type that’s rich in minerals and organic particles. Its water retention is good, yet it has adequate drainage. Silty soils are very easy to work with. The minerals and organic substances within make it one of the most fertile soil types.

  • Medium-coarse
  • Pros: Contains minerals and nutrients, retains water well
  • Cons: Fair drainage

LOAMY

Loamy soil is a combination of sand, silt, and clay soils with added organic compounds. It is one of the best soil types for growing cannabis as it offers optimal water retention and drainage, and it’s rich in nutrients and oxygen. Downside: This type of soil can be expensive.

  • Mixture of sand, silt, and clay
  • Pros: Excellent water retention and drainage, contains nutrients, high oxygen levels
  • Cons: Expensive

Clay soils consist of fine mineral particles. This type of soil is heavy and not easy to work with. It is very rich in nutrients and minerals, which makes it a good option to include in organic grows. Clay soil retains water well, but has poor drainage.

  • Fine particle size
  • High pH
  • Pros: Rich in nutrients, retains water
  • Cons: Poor drainage, heavy and compact, hard to work with

AMENDMENTS TO IMPROVE SOIL QUALITY

If you’re working with natural soil, chances are it won’t be perfect for growing cannabis—not from the start, at least. The texture may not be optimal or it may have poor drainage, for example. But you can improve any type of soil by adding amendments, most of which can be found in your local grow shop.

COCO COIR

Coco coir (coco fibre) is made from coconut husks. These light fibres provide excellent water retention and can lighten compact soils. Some use a pure coco substrate with special nutrients to cultivate their weed. But to amend existing soil, it’s a good idea to add anywhere up to 30% coco coir, depending on the composition of your base soil.

PERLITE

Perlite is the most widely used soil amendment. Perlite consists of very light, bright-white rocks that greatly improve the drainage and airiness of the soil. Perlite also has decent water retention. To amend your soil with it, add 10–15% of perlite. You can add more, but then your soil may become too light and nutrients may leach out. Good-quality commercial soils often come with added perlite.

CLAY PEBBLES

Most cannabis growers are familiar with using clay pebbles as part of a hydroponic setup. But did you know they can also be used to enhance soil structure? Adding clay pebbles to the bottom of your raised beds and containers will assist with drainage and prevent water from pooling at the base—a large risk factor when it comes to root rot.

Growers can also add clay pebbles to the top of containers and beds to serve as a mulch. Here, they help to trap moisture in the growing medium by preventing excess evaporation. Clay pebble mulch also casts shade over the top layer of soil, suppressing weeds and keeping beneficial microbes sheltered from the hot rays of the sun.

VERMICULITE

Vermiculite, just like perlite, is a heat-treated mineral you can use to make your soil lighter.It is also excellent at retaining water. Although vermiculite shares some characteristics with perlite, the two have opposite uses: Use perlite to increase drainage and airiness, and use vermiculite to increase water retention. Luckily, you can use both, as perlite and vermiculite work well together. Around 10% vermiculite is beneficial.

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WORM CASTINGS

Worm castings are normally seen more as a nutritional soil amendment as they contain a plethora of useful microorganisms that benefit growth. But worm castings will also improve the texture, drainage, and water retention of your soil. When amending your soil with worm castings, use about 25–30%.

NUTRIENTS

If your DIY cannabis soil is rich in organic material, you will likely not need to add nutrients to it. As a matter of fact, some growers make the mistake of adding manure and vegetable scraps to their soil to “fertilise” it. This results in soil getting “too hot” for the plants, hurting their development in turn. If you want to put your vegetable scraps to good use in your garden, you first need to compost them.

If you think you need to amend your cannabis soil with nutrients, you can easily purchase bottled solutions tailored to a plant’s phase of growth.

Bat Guano

PHOTOPERIOD VS AUTOFLOWERING

One factor to consider when choosing the right soil for your weed is whether you’re growing photoperiod or autoflowering plants. Autoflowers prefer a light mix with fewer added nutrients. A great substrate for your autoflowering ladies is a 50:50 mix of coco coir and a light, peat-based soil with some added perlite for drainage.

When growing autoflowers, stay away from heavily fertilised soils and certain amendments like bat guano, as these will be too hot and overload your plants with nutrients. The same is true for cannabis seedlings, which do not like high levels of nutrients.

Plant autoflowers in their final growing container in a cup-sized hole in the centre of the soil. Fill the hole with seedling/starter soil with no nutrients and place your seed in it. This way, your seedling can grow without being surrounded by the hot soil, which would otherwise burn it.

For photoperiod plants, start them out in small seedling pots/cups with soil that has little to no nutrients. Replant after a few weeks. More mature plants will tolerate higher nutrient levels much better than seedlings.

STORE-BOUGHT VS HOMEMADE

If you’ve just started growing cannabis, it may be best to simply get ready-made soil from the grow store. The reason for this is that good-quality cannabis soil normally contains everything your plants need for healthy growth, in the optimal ratios. If you want, you can further improve your store-bought soil with a handful of perlite for increased drainage, but otherwise you should be good.

BASIC CANNABIS SOIL RECIPE

On the other hand, there may come a time when you want to make your own soil. After all, why spend good money on soil if your homemade version is even better? Here is a recipe for a basic homemade cannabis soil.

INGREDIENTS
  • 1 part vermiculite
  • 1 part coco coir peat
  • 2 parts compost
  • ½–1 cup worm castings (or humus)
DIRECTIONS
  1. Sieve the compost to remove larger chunks.
  2. Soak the coco coir peat in warm water. Check the directions of the product to see what kind of volume you will be getting.
  3. Use a bucket and mix the coco coir peat with the vermiculite.
  4. Add the compost.

Done! Double-check the pH value of your homemade soil. It should be in the range of 5.8–6.3.

The above is a basic soil recipe that will serve you well for most grows, indoors and outdoors. But you can further enhance your soil mix by adding organic fertilisers.

Bat guano is an excellent and inexpensive organic fertiliser for flowering marijuana. You can add it to a soil mix or spread it on the topsoil and water in later. You can also look into time-release nutrients such as Easy Boost Organic Nutrition pellets. Add a cup of these to your soil to feed your plants for their whole life cycle—100g is enough for 2–3 cannabis plants. All that’s left to do is water!

NO-TILL CULTIVATION

No-till cultivation is a gardening method that allows the soil to remain undisturbed (no digging, stirring, overturning, etc.). This way, microorganisms in the soil can create a thriving ecosystem that replenishes the soil with good bacteria, helpful fungi, and other living organisms. No-till cultivation promotes organic matter retention and water absorption because nutrients are constantly being recycled throughout the soil.

To learn about no-till cultivation and its benefits, check out this article!

AMENDMENTS FOR ARID/DROUGHT CONDITIONS

If you’re growing outdoors in a hot climate such as Southern Spain or a similar location, you don’t want to “cook” the root zone of your plants. If you’re using pots, choose white plastic containers, as these help to keep the soil temperature at a reasonable level under the beating sun. You can also look to air pots or smart pots to keep the roots of your cannabis plants cool. As an additional measure to protect the soil from fluctuating temperatures, you can add layers of dry straw onto the topsoil.

If you’re growing in drought conditions where your plants may at times go weeks without rain, or if you can’t make daily trips to your guerrilla grow location, use water-absorbent polymers to keep them hydrated! You can get these from hydroponic grow stores or can cut them out of diapers.

For a guerrilla grow in dry conditions, dig a hole about 60cm deep and 30cm in diameter. Add a few cups of polymer crystals to the bottom of the soil mix and fill up with the remaining soil. Place your plant into the soil and water liberally. As your plant grows, the roots will soon reach the polymers so it can drink even during drought. Tip: Soak the polymers in a light nutrient solution for a double benefit!

Learn now how to choose the best soil for growing cannabis

Most weed gardeners know that growing cannabis in soil is a common and effective growing method.

The difficulty is that growers have to peruse through many soil options and may find it challenging to determine the right option for them.

Well, sit tight! In this article, we’ll be showing you how to choose the best soil for cannabis to give your marijuana the best chances of fat buds and a huge yield.

Why is choosing the best soil for cannabis very important?

Soil is one of the three components (including water and light) needed to help a plant

Choosing the best soil is vital as, without it, a plant can’t grow effectively and may end up lacking nutrients or even under developing. Good earth also helps provide plants with the health needed to survive under challenging weather conditions.

Along with learning about temperature and humidity for growing weed, understanding soil is vital. It spells the difference between a plant that didn’t grow to one that exceeded expectations.

The components that make up the soil

Soil consists of several components and is quite complex in its makeup. Let’s look at what these are:

  • Air: 25% of soil is simply air.
  • Water: A further 25% of the earth is water. It’s vital for moving nutrients to the plants.
  • Clay: One of the three primary materials found in soil, clay, like the other minerals, is derived from broken-down rocks.
  • Sand: This is one of the primary minerals found in dirt. Minerals, in fact, make up 46% of all soil.
  • Silt: The second of the primary minerals found within the soil.
  • Organic matter: This makes up the remaining 4% of the earth. Soils high in organic matter are brilliant for plant growth.

Knowing what good soil is

You can identify excellent cannabis soil by looking at a few key indicators.

  • Dark and loose: Dark soil is rich soil. It means that they contain plenty of organic matter, sodium, and healthy nutrients. Loose soil allows for better aeration.
  • Good drainage & water retention: Good drainage means that the marijuana water can drain to the bottom well. Well-drained earth ensures that your cannabis stays wet for a reasonable amount of time. An appropriate amount of water retention is vital to keep cannabis healthy.
  • The correct pH value: The ideal pH value is about 6.0 as cannabis plants thrive better in a slightly acidic environment.
  • Organic matter: Organic matter is decomposed material derived from plants and animals. It helps provide nutrients and improves the water holding capacity of the soil. Examples include compost and manure.
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Choosing the best soil for marijuana

The best soil depends on the conditions that you’re growing your marijuana. So, for example, what’s needed for outdoor marijuana is different from that for indoor cannabis.

Let’s break it down.

Best soil for outdoor cannabis

The benefit of growing cannabis outdoors is that your plants won’t be as restricted and can further grow their roots.

However, you’ll have to monitor and possibly change the soil’s pH level if it’s not suitable.

Cannabis plants all need nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium in their soil ‘diet’. These nutrients will be absorbed at different rates and need to be renewed with a good marijuana fertilizer from time to time.

A dark, crumbly loam works best outdoors that’s mostly silt.

Best soil for indoor cannabis

Loamy soil is the best for indoor cannabis. An ideal mixture of 40% silt, 40% clay, and 20% sand offers a loose soil texture for adequate oxygenation and root growth. This mix also offers good water retention, drainage, and an ideal pH level of 6.0.

Best potting soil for cannabis

Firstly, it’s important to note that no matter what pot you use, always make sure that there are holes at the bottom to prevent your cannabis from drowning.

Cannabis can be effectively grown in pots using pre-packaged organic soil.

An alternative is to make what is known as a ‘super soil’ mix. You’ll have to find a super soil recipe or order a mix online. It’s a great option as it self-regulates its pH levels.

Best organic soil for cannabis

Creating the best organic soil for marijuana is tricky, but there are a few components that can drastically improve its health and efficacy:

Component What it offers
Worm castings This is a good source of nitrogen. It’ll also give your soil the added benefit of many micronutrients.
Bone meal For a source of phosphorus, this is the way to go.
Chicken manure Chicken manure is an excellent source for adding nitrogen and phosphorus to your soil.
Bat guano This is also a good way to get phosphorus and nitrogen into your organic soil. It also diversifies the soil’s bacteria.
Compost Compost piles can be an excellent source of nutrients such as potassium.
Kelp meal Both promoting microbial diversity and offering potassium, kelp meal is a great component to add to organic soil.

Best soil for autoflowering cannabis

Autoflower cannabis seeds transition automatically from the vegetative to flowering stage regardless of the light availability.

However, for this type of cannabis, light and aerated soil is preferred. This aids the roots in growing deeper.

You can make the best soil for autoflowers from peat moss, compost, vermiculite, and coco coir.

Store-bought vs. homemade

If you’re not interested in the hassle of putting together your own soil, then you can always stop at a local shop or peruse an online store for some good-quality mix that’s ready-made.

Although homemade soil may lack on some fronts, it does offer certain benefits. Let’s take a look at what those are compared to store-bought:

Homemade Cannabis Soil Store-Bought Cannabis Soil
Greater flexibility of choice. Already pre-packaged.
Generally cheaper than store-bought cannabis. More expensive than homemade cannabis.
It requires more research to figure out and can be complicated. The work to put together nutrients and research is already done for you.
Easier and cheaper to make in bulk. Often comes in smaller packaging.

How to make your own soil

Making your own soil may be preferable for many as ready-made soil mixes can be pretty expensive. Here are a few steps that you can follow to get started:

Step 1: To start with creating your marijuana soil mix, you can opt to find soil at your local gardening store. Alternatively, you can use the soil you have at home.

Step 2: Next, you’ll need to add the building blocks of cannabis: nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium. You can find these components in worm castings, bone meal, and compost.

Step 3: Then, mix the soil. It’s as simple as that, and you’re on your way to having the best soil to grow marijuana.

Improving the soil, you already have

There are several minerals, soils, and nutrients that you can add to the soil you already have to make it suitable to grow excellent cannabis. Here are a few suggestions:

  • Coco for cannabis: Coco-coir is a flexible growing medium made out of coconut shells that grants your plants the ability to grow even faster than they already are.
  • Perlite: This can help loosen and provide excellent aeration to the soil and also aids in the speed of growth of the plant.
  • Vermiculite: This is good for dampening the soil and raising the pH level of your cannabis.
  • Worm castings: These are great for resolving nitrogen cannabis deficiencies. This nutrient-rich manure is perfect for any weed soil mix.
  • Nutrients: Along with nitrogen, potassium, and phosphorus, marijuana soil also needs calcium, magnesium, copper, iron, and many others.

Before we move on to our FAQs: if you want to know more about growing, be sure to check out our marijuana for beginners guide. It offers a lot of helpful information about costs, climate, strains, and much more relating to growing marijuana.

FAQs related to best soil for cannabis

We’ve scoured the internet and put together the most frequently asked questions to help you find the best soil for growing weed.

What is the best soil for growing cannabis?

Loam is undoubtedly the best soil for growing cannabis. Its pH level is close to the ideal level of 6.0. Regrettably, it’s quite an expensive soil to buy but a worthwhile investment if you want to grow the best marijuana plants possible.

What is the best soil for outdoor cannabis?

Outdoor cannabis grows well with organic soil. You can make your own or opt to purchase a mix online or at a local garden store.

What is the best soil for indoor cannabis?

The ideal is the same as the best overall cannabis soil, which is loam. If you’re not willing to pay the price, though, you can always opt for a nice pre-packaged cannabis soil mix. Just make sure that it’s full of quality nutrients!

What is the best organic soil for cannabis?

You’ll want a soil mix that’s teaming with all the necessary micro and macronutrients needed for your plants. A nice blend of worm castings, rock dust, bone meal, bat guano, and various other soil amendments is the way to go.

What are the best nutrients for cannabis in soil?

The fundamentals are:

  • Nitrogen (blood meal, ammonia, or cottonseed meal).
  • Phosphate (bone meal, slag, and rock phosphate).
  • Potassium (wood ashes or seaweeds).

It comes down to you

As you can see, there’s a lot to consider when choosing the best soil for growing marijuana. It depends on the type, where you’ll be growing it, and what you hope to achieve.

There are a lot of great ready-made products out there, both online and in-store. It just takes some time and research to figure out which is right for you.

Do you feel ready to start growing? Peruse the i49 website and decide on the right cannabis seeds for you to start your growing journey today.

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